Spring Practicum Series

Spring Practicum Series

We’re delighted to share the spring dates for the WWP’s practicum series of two-hour workshops focused on particular skills and tools. Each session will be held from 12 to 2pm in the Digital Scholarship Commons in Snell Library. In the spring, we will be offering: February 5: An XPath Excursion. This session will cover the basics of exploring and querying XML documents using XPath; we will navigate the document tree, limit our results to meet specific criteria, and discuss ways to…

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To the Right Honourable, Virtuous, Heroical Reader

To the Right Honourable, Virtuous, Heroical Reader

This post was authored by Anna Kroon, University of New Haven class of 2019, who held an internship at the WWP during the summer of 2017.  I came to the Women Writers Project really excited to work on such a large project with a wide variety of texts in their files. My experience was limited to Victorian shipboard newspapers, so anything not related to the ocean or intellectual boat humor was thrilling to me. Since I had experience with XML…

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WWP Practicum Series

WWP Practicum Series

We’re delighted to announce that the WWP will be offering a new practicum series during the 2017–2018 academic year. In this series, we’ll be holding two-hour workshops focused on particular skills and tools. Each session will be held from 10am to 12pm in the Digital Scholarship Commons in Snell Library. In the fall, we will be offering: October 4: File Management For Digital Humanities Researchers. This session will cover essential strategies and design considerations for organizing files and research data for…

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Intertextual Networks: Theorizing and Encoding Textual Connections in Early Women’s Writing

Intertextual Networks: Theorizing and Encoding Textual Connections in Early Women’s Writing

Below are lecture notes from a paper by Sarah Connell and Julia Flanders, part of a panel on intertextuality in early women’s texts at DH2017.  I want to begin by thanking our co-panelists for their really thoughtful and exciting presentations, as well as my co-author Julia Flanders, the conference organizers, and, of course, all of you for joining us today. I also have to thank the NEH for their support of this project as well as the rest of the…

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Word Embedding Models Are the New Topic Models

Word Embedding Models Are the New Topic Models

By Jonathan Fitzgerald, Ph.D. Candidate in English, Northeastern University I remember the first time I trained a topic model. It was in a course called Humanities Data Analysis, taught by Ben Schmidt. He provided us a corpus of the Federalist Papers and some code that he adapted from David Mimno, contributor to the original MALLET package and author of the R implementation of MALLET. After the initial confusion–“topics” aren’t topics in the traditional sense, after all–it felt like magic. The computer…

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Intertextuality in Mary Astell’s A Serious Proposal to the Ladies (1694) and in Reflections upon Marriage (1706)

Intertextuality in Mary Astell’s A Serious Proposal to the Ladies (1694) and in Reflections upon Marriage (1706)

This post is part of a series authored by our collaborators on the Intertextual Networks project. For more information, see here.  By Ioanna Kyvernitou, National University of Ireland, Galway  For Intertextual Networks, I am evaluating the markup in two works of Mary Astell (1666–1731) as found in Women Writers Online–A Serious Proposal to the Ladies, for the Advancement of Their True and Greatest Interest (1694) and the third edition of Reflections upon Marriage (1706)–in order to consider practices for encoding intertextuality. Astell, a philosopher and theologian who…

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“‘The Text is Variety’: Contextualizing and Analyzing the Works of Margaret Cavendish with Text Encoding

“‘The Text is Variety’: Contextualizing and Analyzing the Works of Margaret Cavendish with Text Encoding

Below are lecture notes from Sarah Connell’s presentation at the 2017 International Margaret Cavendish Society Conference. The slides are available as a separate file here. Okay, so, since one of the themes of this conference is how Cavendish was received, I want to begin with a quote about her from a text in Women Writers Online. So, here we have Elizabeth Benger on Cavendish, speaking of her fertile fancy, her uncommon genius, her wildness and inaccuracy, and her voluminous works. And,…

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Announcing New Publications to Women Writers Online and Women Writers in Context

Announcing New Publications to Women Writers Online and Women Writers in Context

The WWP is delighted to report that we have added six new texts to Women Writers Online. These are: Hester Chapone’s 1777 A Letter to a New-Married Lady, Emily Clark’s 1819 The Esquimaux (vol. 3), Anne Conway’s 1692 Principles of the Most Ancient and Modern Philosophy, Caroline Cushing’s 1832 Letters, Descriptive of Public Monuments, Scenery, and Manners in France and Spain (vol. 2), Sarah Osborn and Susanna Anthony’s 1807 Familiar Letters, and Mary Pix’s 1699 The False Friend. In addition to spanning three centuries, these texts highlight the diversity…

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The Queen’s Two Corpora: Finding Elizabeth and Creating Corpora using the WWO Database

The Queen’s Two Corpora: Finding Elizabeth and Creating Corpora using the WWO Database

This post is part of a series authored by our collaborators on the Intertextual Networks project. For more information, see here.  By Kristen Abbott Bennett, Stonehill College At Tilbury, Elizabeth I gave a rousing speech to motivate her subjects, exclaiming: “I know I have the bodie, but of a weak and feeble woman, but I have the heart and Stomach of a King, and of a King of England” (Cabala). Elizabeth’s recognition of her female princely bodies as simultaneously separate and the same reflects…

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Teaching Tags and Metadata in Women Writers in Review

Teaching Tags and Metadata in Women Writers in Review

By Jason M. Payton, Sam Houston State University Note: Jason M. Payton is a pedagogical development consultant for the WWP. PROJECT OVERVIEW My course is a junior-level survey of American literature to 1865, and my students are primarily English majors and minors (course syllabus here). Most of my students have never had a class in women’s and gender studies, so I wanted to use the survey course as an opportunity to engage students with some of the critical issues raised in these…

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