Announcements

June 9, 2022

Six New Texts Added to Women Writers Online

We are pleased to announce that we have added six new texts to Women Writers Online: Grace Barwick’s 1659 To All the Present Rulers, Phebe Gibbe’s 1789 Hartly House, Calcutta (vol. 1), Barbara Hofland’s 1828 Africa Described, Lucy Terry Prince’s 1855 Bars Fight, Helen Maria William’s 1784 Peru, a Poem, and the anonymous 1820 Zelica, the Creole (vol. 1).

These texts connect closely with the WWP’s grant project, “Representing Racial Identity in Early Women’s Writing,” funded by Northeastern’s TIER 1 program, with co-PIs Professors Nicole Aljoe and Julia Flanders. For more on this project, see “Representing Race in the Early Modern Archive” by Cailin Roles.

May 25, 2022

The WWP Launches Women Writers: Intertextual Networks

We are very excited to announce a new open-access research tool! Women Writers: Intertextual Networks is the result of a three-year project focusing on intertextuality in early women’s writing. This collaborative research initiative examined the citation and quotation practices of the authors represented in Women Writers Online (WWO) to explore and theorize the representation of intertextuality, and to study the ways in which early women writers named, cited, quoted, and remixed texts by other authors. We identified and encoded each of these “intertextual gestures” within the Women Writers Project collection, traced their sources, and created a bibliography representing all of the materials referenced by WWP authors. We also gathered a team of external collaborators who prepared exhibits exploring particular forms and uses of intertextuality in women’s writing, which are being published in Women Writers in Context, our open-access collection of critical exhibits. This project was generously funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

The interface offers many ways to explore early women writers' engagements with other authors and texts. There are four interconnected “explorer” spaces focused on different aspects of the data: the bibliography, the topics and genres referenced, the intertextual gestures, and the authors in Women Writers Online. The Bibliography of works quoted, named, cited, or otherwise referenced by the authors in Women Writers Online currently includes more than 3,000 works. The Topics & Genres explorer includes referenced texts that range from agriculture to ethics to history to travel writing. The Intertextual Gestures explorer supports filtering by the different types of intertextual gestures, the various works that are referenced, the topics and genres of the referenced works, and the WWO source texts and authors. Finally, the Authors in WWO explorer provides a summary view of the intertextual gestures in each of the 440 texts in the Women Writers Online collection.

Intertextual Networks may become slow at times of high usage. We ask for your patience as you explore all that the site has to offer.

We are especially excited about the teaching possibilities for Intertextual Networks: if you have ideas about using Intertextual Networks in the classroom, or if you’re interested in joining our teaching partners program, please contact us! Teaching partners receive free access to Women Writers Online and can share course materials at the WWP site. We also plan to continue sharing the research made possible through this project on the Women Writers in Context platform. If you are interested in submitting an exhibit to Women Writers in Context, please see our guidelines for authors and our statement on peer review. To learn more about this project and its development, please visit the WWP blog.

Please contact us at wwp@neu.edu if you have questions about or feedback on Intertextual Networks.

Intertextual Networks has been made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this project, do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

December 17, 2021

Seven New Texts Added to Women Writers Online

We are pleased to announce that we have added seven new texts to Women Writers Online: Claire de Duras’s 1824 Ourika, Anna Maria Falconbridge’s 1794 Two Voyages to Sierra Leone, Elizabeth Hamilton’s 1796 Translation of the Letters of a Hindoo Rajah (vol. 2), Christian Johnstone’s 1827 Elizabeth de Bruce (vol. 1), Mary Prince’s 1831 The History of Mary Prince, Mary Rowlandson’s 1682 The Sovereignty and Goodness of God, and Betsey Stockton’s 1824-25 Betsey Stockton’s Journal.

These texts connect closely with the WWP’s grant project, “Representing Racial Identity in Early Women’s Writing,” funded by Northeastern’s TIER 1 program, with co-PIs Professors Nicole Aljoe and Julia Flanders. For more on this project, see “Representing Race in the Early Modern Archive” by Cailin Roles. Highlights among this publication set include the journal of Betsey Stockton, who described her missionary work in Hawaii in a journal that was published serially in the Christian Advocate, as well as the autobiography of the abolitionist Mary Prince.

December 9, 2021

Call for Teaching Partners

Women Writers Online will be free for the month of March, in celebration of Women’s History Month. This collection includes more than 425 texts written and translated by women, first published between 1526 and 1850. For the current list of texts in WWO see here. We also wanted to share some resources developed by our teaching partners, and circulate a call for those who are interested in joining the teaching partners program with the WWP.

If you’d like more ideas about using WWO in the classroom, we have a growing set of resources on teaching with Women Writers Online, including both assignments and syllabi. We also have a program in which teaching partners collaborate with us to create activities, assignments, and syllabi. You can read more about the program and see some of the materials developed by our partners here.

We would particularly welcome teaching partnerships that engage with concepts of race and racialized identities. In addition to the texts already in WWO, we will soon be publishing several texts that may be of interest to teachers and researchers who are working with racial identities, colonialism, and empire. These include Mary Prince’s History of Mary Prince, Betsey Stockton’s Journal, Mary Rowlandson’s The Sovereignty and Goodness of God, Claire de Duras’s Ourika, Anna Maria Falconbridge’s Two Voyages to Sierra Leone, and Elizabeth Hamilton’s Translation of the Letters of a Hindoo Rajah. A full list of forthcoming texts is here. We would welcome suggestions for other texts that we should add to the collection!

If you’re interested in becoming a teaching partner yourself or have teaching ideas to share, please email us for more information (wwp@neu.edu). If you’d like to work with Women Writers Online prior to March, and you don’t have institutional access, we would be happy to set up a trial (more details on WWO licensing and trials are here. And finally, if you have questions about any of the WWP’s publications, or suggestions for texts that we should add to our collections, please don’t hesitate to get in touch.

September 2, 2021

Call for Participation: Word Vectors for the Thoughtful Humanist

Applications are invited for participation in the final event in our series of advanced institutes on text analysis, sponsored by the Northeastern University Women Writers Project with generous funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities. These events introduce teachers and researchers at varied levels of expertise to the text analysis methods and interpretive questions arising from word embedding models, which represent connections between words as computable spatial relationships. These institutes will explore practical techniques and also interpretive outcomes, working with simple, open-access web tools hosted in the Women Writers Online Lab, as well as RStudio.

This program includes four institutes, three of which have already taken place in 2019 and 2021 (see our list of past events). The remaining event is an intensive institute focused on pedagogical uses of word vectors, including coverage of RStudio and the challenges of teaching command-line tools in a humanities context. The institute will be held virtually over five days (12:30–5:00 Eastern each day). Following the institute we will have a three-month period of virtual discussion and consultation with WWP staff and fellow participants to ensure that these challenging concepts and techniques can be thoroughly internalized. Participants will be encouraged to share research and teaching outcomes (syllabi, assignments, blog posts, research papers) and will be given the opportunity to post preliminary results and work in progress on the WWP blog.

We’re now inviting applications for the final event. For information on how to apply, and for more detailed information on the workshops, please see here.

Word Vectors for the Thoughtful Humanist: Intensive, Teaching-focused
Virtual event hosted at Northeastern University, May 16–20, 2022
Application deadline: January 31, 2022
Participants notified by February 25, 2022

Word Vectors for the Thoughtful Humanist has been made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this project, do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

June 15, 2021

Five New Texts Added to Women Writers Online

We are pleased to announce that we have added five new texts to Women Writers Online: Aphra Behn’s 1688 Oroonoko, Eliza Haywood’s 1728 The Agreeable Caledonian, M. Marsin’s 1700 Good News to the Good Women, Chloe Russel’s 1800 The Complete Fortune Teller and Dream Book, and Hannah Wolley’s 1668 A Guide to Ladies, Gentlewomen, and Maids.

These texts reflect the breadth of women’s engagements with social and political concerns, and highlight the chronological range of the WWO collection. Several also connect with the WWP’s current grant project, “Representing Racial Identity in Early Women’s Writing,” funded by Northeastern’s TIER 1 program, with co-PIs Professors Nicole Aljoe and Julia Flanders. The WWP will soon be publishing a substantial set of additional texts by women of color or thematizing race as part of this grant project. For more on this project, see “Representing Race in the Early Modern Archive” by Cailin Roles.

June 17, 2020

Eight New Texts Added to Women Writers Online

The WWP is delighted to report that we have added eight new texts to Women Writers Online: Lady Maria Callcott’s 1814 Letters on India, Mary Elizabeth Davis’s 1839 The British Partizan, Maria Edgeworth’s 1800 The Barring Out and Castle Rackrent, Eliza Haywood’s 1726 The City Jilt, and Mary Wollstonecraft’s 1796 Letters Written during a Short Residence in Sweden, Norway, and Denmark. We have also added two new folders from the Almanacks of Mary Moody Emerson, created in partnership with the editors of The Almanacks of Mary Moody Emerson: A Scholarly Digital Edition: Folder 29, a brief Almanack with three dated entries from 2 October 1853 to 17 September 1855; and Folder 32, six manuscript sheets written from 6 December 1846 to 23 March 1847.

These new texts show how early women writers engaged with matters of gender, empire, and colonialism, while participating in political discourse on an international scale. For example, Edgeworth’s Castle Rackrent is a complex and arguably anticolonialist historical novel that offers an Anglo-Irish view of the state of Ireland under British rule, while Callcott adopts a utilitarian stance for the information in her her Letters on India, saying that the work was “written solely with the design of being useful to such as are called upon to go at an early period of life, to India.” Wollstonecraft’s letters are both travel narrative and memoir, with extensive consideration of philosophical matters and examinations of women’s role in society. Wollstonecraft writes of her daughter, Mary: “I feel more than a mother’s fondness and anxiety, when I reflect on the dependent and oppressed state of her sex. I dread lest she should be forced to sacrifice her heart to her principles, or principles to her heart.”

While all of the files have been proofed, because of the COVID-19 pandemic we are unable to complete our full set of review procedures for The City Jilt, Wollstonecraft’s Letters, and The British Partizan. We will finalize these files as soon as we are able to return to our offices.

See here for a full list of the texts in WWO and here for a list of more recently-added titles.

For older announcements please see our archive.