Representing Race in the Early Modern Archive

Representing Race in the Early Modern Archive

By Cailin Roles Here at the Women Writers Project, our central work is text encoding: we encode works in English or English translation by women before 1850 in XML, following the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI). In 2020, the WWP expanded to include a new, internally-funded collaborative project, which asks whether and how digital collections of historical texts can represent racial identity. Building on the work of scholars like Kim Hall (1995), Brigitte Fielder (2020), and Jessica Marie Johnson (2020), we…

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Experiments in Tokenization for Word Embedding Models

Experiments in Tokenization for Word Embedding Models

By Juniper Johnson During my time as the 2019–2020 NULab Coordinator, I extended my previous research experience with the Women Writers Project to build an XSLT script for tokenizing element content for the Women Writers Vector Toolkit (WWVT). The WWVT is an online laboratory for learning about and experimenting with word embedding models and features over 20 models created using the Women Writers Online (WWO) corpus and parallel corpora created from the Text Creation Partnership collections. The WWVT models are…

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The Almanacs of Sarah Jinner and Mary Holden and their Connection to Female Healthcare

The Almanacs of Sarah Jinner and Mary Holden and their Connection to Female Healthcare

By Grace O’Mara, WWP Research and Encoding Specialist and PEAK Award Recipient The Goal Over the past four months, I have spent my time researching Sarah Jinner’s 1659 almanac “An Almanack and Prognostication for the Year of our Lord 1659 being the Third After Bissextile Or Leap Year: Calculated for the Meridian of London, and may Differently Serve for England, Scotland, and Ireland / by Sarah Jinner Student in Astrology” and Mary Holden’s 1688 title “The Women’s Almanack for the…

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Women Writers Online Is Free for the Month of March

Women Writers Online Is Free for the Month of March

We are delighted to announce that Women Writers Online (WWO) will once again be free during the month of March in celebration of Women’s History Month. The collection contains more than 420 texts written and translated by women, and published between 1526 and 1850. We also invite you to explore our other publications, which are always open access. These include Women Writers in Review (WWiR), a collection of close to 700 reviews of and responses to works in WWO, and Women Writers in Context (WWiC), a…

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Challenging Colonial Discourse Through TEI Markup in Maria Callcott’s “Letters”

Challenging Colonial Discourse Through TEI Markup in Maria Callcott’s “Letters”

By Jacob Murel In his book The Cult of Emptiness: The Western Discovery of Buddhist Thought and the Invention of Oriental Philosophy (2012), Urs App tells the story of the sixteenth-century murderer Anjirō (also, Yajirō) who fled Japan and joined the Jesuit order in Malacca. After being baptized and instructed in the Christian faith under Francis Xavier, Anjirō returned to Japan as a translator between the Jesuit missionaries and Japan’s Buddhist community. Anjirō’s respective descriptions of Buddhism to the Malaccan…

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Announcing new additions to “Thirty Years, Thirty Ideas”

Announcing new additions to “Thirty Years, Thirty Ideas”

We are excited to share that we’ve now added three new exhibits to the “Thirty Years, “Thirty Ideas” series. The series of short explorations of Women Writers Online launched in celebration of the 30th anniversary of the Women Writers Project in 2018. In this series, authors consider a single topic—such as reading, childbirth, war, servants, clothing, or the environment—as an entry point into the WWO collection. The essays in the series, published on our open-access Women Writers in Context platform, are aimed at kindling excitement in readers…

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“A Most Illustrious and Distinctive Career”

“A Most Illustrious and Distinctive Career”

By Becky Standard This post is part of a series we will be publishing with projects from the July 2019 Institutes Series: Word Vectors for the Thoughtful Humanist. For more information on the seminar, see here.  In July 2019 I was selected to attend the workshop “Word Vectors for the Thoughtful Humanist” expertly hosted by the Women Writers Project (WWP) at Northeastern University. Funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities made it possible for me to travel to Boston…

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A Word Embedding Model of One’s Own: Modern Fiction from Materialism to Spiritualism

A Word Embedding Model of One’s Own: Modern Fiction from Materialism to Spiritualism

By James Clawson This post is part of a series we will be publishing with projects from the July 2019 Institutes Series: Word Vectors for the Thoughtful Humanist. For more information on the seminar, see here.  Woolf’s essays heading into the third decade of the 20th century — especially “Modern Fiction,” “Mr. Bennet and Mrs. Brown,” and “The Russian Point of View” — show her interest in the changing shape of literature of the time, especially as it related to…

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Entity Linking Research Paper Works with WWO Data

Entity Linking Research Paper Works with WWO Data

We are thrilled to share the publication of From Zero to Hero: Human-In-The-Loop Entity Linking in Low Resource Domains by Jan-Christoph Klie, Richard Eckart de Castilho, and Iryna Gurevych. The project focused on improving entity linking (EL) annotation by presenting a Human-In-The-Loop annotation approach to speed up the annotation process and make it less tedious.  From Zero to Hero worked with three datasets, including data from Women Writers Online (WWO). Documents from WWO have been annotated with named entities and…

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Explaining Words, in Nature and Science: Textual Analysis in Galileo’s Works

Explaining Words, in Nature and Science: Textual Analysis in Galileo’s Works

By Caterina Agostini This post is part of a series we will be publishing with projects from the July 2019 Institutes Series: Word Vectors for the Thoughtful Humanist. For more information on the seminar, see here.  Corpus, Methods, and Guidelines The objects of my research are scientific thinking, language, and modes of communication from 1543 to the 1630s, when astronomer Copernicus, physician Vesalius, scientist Galileo, and numerous others published texts which, from a modern perspective, mark the starting point of…

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