Women Writers Online: Free in March 2019 & Teaching Resources

Women Writers Online: Free in March 2019 & Teaching Resources

We are pleased to announce that Women Writers Online will once again be free for the month of March, in celebration of Women’s History Month. This collection includes more than 400 texts written and translated by women, first published between 1526 and 1850 (for the current list of texts in WWO see here). We can also share some resources developed by our teaching partners, and circulate a call for those who are interested in joining the teaching partners program with…

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Genre and Gender Differences

Genre and Gender Differences

This is a post in a series authored by our encoding team on the Intertextual Networks project. For more information, see here. By Kenneth Oravetz, WWP Research Fellow, Northeastern University I joined the Women Writers Project to create a genre taxonomy for the Intertextual Networks bibliography, a bibliography of all of the works cited in the early modern texts in the Women Writers Online collection. I wrote a bit about the process behind creating that taxonomy here. With the taxonomy in place,…

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Stylometry and Women Writers Online

Stylometry and Women Writers Online

By Molly Nebiolo, Research and Encoding Specialist I was able to fly to Victoria, British Columbia to to attend DHSI 2018 thanks to a course waiver awarded by DHSI and a NuLab Seedling Grant that funded my transportation and housing for the class. Details on my experience with DHSI can be read here. Stylometry is a way to compare the similarity of texts in vector space and visualize those connections or changes between authors, over time, or across genres. The…

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Tackling Biblical Referencing in the WWO Archive with TEI markup

Tackling Biblical Referencing in the WWO Archive with TEI markup

This is a post in a series authored by our encoders on the Intertextual Networks project. For more information, see here. By Molly Nebiolo, Research and Encoding Specialist, Intertextual Networks, Northeastern University One of the distinctive features of a collection of early modern texts is the large amount of biblical references and quotes. For the Women Writers Online corpus, this is particularly evident. There are approximately 3,800 biblical references throughout the WWO collection, each of which have been tagged with the elements <regMe> (or…

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Creating the Intertextual Networks Genre Taxonomy

Creating the Intertextual Networks Genre Taxonomy

This is a post in a series authored by our encoding team on the Intertextual Networks project. For more information, see here. By Kenneth Oravetz, WWP Research Fellow, Northeastern University I joined the WWP in the middle of the Intertextual Networks project, an effort to create a comprehensive bibliography of the works cited, quoted, and alluded to by the authors in Women Writers Online, the main WWP collection of pre-Victorian women’s writing. Following my aforementioned interests in genre classification, I decided to…

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Ways of Reading: Women Writers in Review, Word Tree, and Digital Humanities Praxis

Ways of Reading: Women Writers in Review, Word Tree, and Digital Humanities Praxis

By Jason M. Payton, Sam Houston State University Note: Jason M. Payton is a pedagogical development consultant for the WWP. He will be joining the faculty of the Department of English at the University of Georgia in the fall of 2018. During the Spring 2018 semester, my early American literature survey course completed a two-phase assignment sequence designed to familiarize students with the broad aims of Women Writers in Review and to introduce them to digital humanities tools and practices. The first phase of the assignment…

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Reflection: Context Website Project

Reflection: Context Website Project

By Amanda Barnett, Texas Christian University Note: Amanda Barnett is a pedagogical development consultant for the WWP. Read the assignment discussed below here and see the syllabus here. Drafting: When I was assigned the Introduction to Women’s Writing course for Spring 2018 I was excited to create something new and, wanting to insert something of my own expertise, I decided that we would spend the semester discussing representations of professional women in literature of all kinds. Because this class is technically at the sophomore level, but…

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Like a Woman: Gender Confusion in The Merry Wives of Windsor and Who’s the Dupe?

Like a Woman: Gender Confusion in The Merry Wives of Windsor and Who’s the Dupe?

This is a post in a series authored by our collaborators on the Intertextual Networks project. For more information, see here. By Tabitha Kenlon, Assistant Professor at the American University in Dubai My previous post explored eighteenth-century British playwright Hannah Cowley’s references to and borrowings from William Shakespeare in her A Bold Stroke for a Husband. That play contains a direct reference to Taming of the Shrew and features a cross-dressed heroine and a love quadrangle that seems to have been inspired by…

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Investigating Crime in the Vector Space of Early Modern Women’s Writing

Investigating Crime in the Vector Space of Early Modern Women’s Writing

by Lara Rose, PhD Student: Literature, Northeastern University This post is part of the Women Writers Project sub-project that explores the intersection of text encoding and text analysis using word embedding models. For brief explanations and early explorations, please see this post by Elizabeth Polcha, and this post by Jonathan Fitzgerald. “When a woman killed her husband, it was petty treason—a crime against the nation—When a man killed his wife, it was only murder.” -Professor Marina Leslie, on gender and…

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Literary Exceptionalism, Literary Community: Mary Wroth in Context

Literary Exceptionalism, Literary Community: Mary Wroth in Context

This post is part of a series authored by our collaborators on the Intertextual Networks project. For more information, see here.  By Amanda Henrichs, Amherst College In my previous post for the Intertextual Networks project, I outlined some of the background of the Sidney family and of my planned contribution to the project; briefly, scholarship on the women of the Sidney family accepts as fact a strong literary relationship between Mary Wroth and her aunt Mary Sidney Herbert. Wroth is mostly clearly influenced…

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